Foreign language instruction benefits from using the learner’s accent, study suggests

From Innovations Report:

Perception of second language speech is easier when it is spoken in the accent of the listener and not in the ‘original’ accent of that language, shows a new study from the University of Haifa. The study was published in the prestigious Journal of Psycholinguistic Research.

Many adult schools teaching second languages insist on exposing their students to the languages in their ‘original’ accents. However, this new study, carried out by [a group of Israeli researchers] found that this system is not necessarily the best and certainly not the most expeditious…

“This research lays emphasis on the importance of continuing investigation into the cognitive perspectives of accent in order to gain a better understanding of how we learn languages other than our native tongue. In Israel and in other countries where the population is made up of many different language groups, this understanding holds great significance,” the researchers conclude.

Advertisements

One response to “Foreign language instruction benefits from using the learner’s accent, study suggests

  1. Larry Hettinger

    Actually, I don’t believe the study – at least as reported in link provided – allows any conclusion about ease of LEARNING. It only concludes that ease of IDENTIFICATION is easier if a word is spoken with the listener’s native aspect. This may or may not translate to easier learning.